Board Changes Its Mind – and Winds Up in Court (NY)

What happens when a co-op board approves an alteration project and then changes its mind? What usually happens is a lawsuit. Consider the case of Salvatore Moltisanti.  In 2012, Moltisanti purchased an apartment in the four-building 1,672-unit Co-op Village on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Many of the apartments had enclosed balconies, and Moltisanti wanted one too. He asserted that he was told by the board that no permits were necessary, and that after the payment of certain fees and the retention of an approved contractor, the enclosure could be built. It took more than two years to install the framework for the enclosure.     Read the article…………….


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