AB 2362 – Why You Should Use a Licensed Pest Control Operator (CA)

Beginning January 1, 2017, a common interest development association or its authorized agent must provide notice to an owner and any tenant if a pesticide is to be applied to a separate interest or common area without using a licensed pest control operator. Under certain circumstances, notice will also be required to owners and any tenants of separate interests adjacent to the area of application of the pesticide.  This new law is adopted as part of the Davis-Stirling Common Interest Development Act as Civil Code section 4777. Landlords and licensed pest control operators are already subject to these notice requirements which will be extended to include common interest development associations. The primary purpose of this new law is to apply the same notice requirements to pesticide applications by unlicensed pest control operators.    Read the article……………


Related Articles

How Nevada SB 306 and Court Rulings Have Changed the Foreclosure Landscape

SB 306 contained a number of important revisions to Nevada’s super-priority lien statute that will provide protection to first lien

Oregon Court Denies HOA’s Effort to Proceed Against Subcontractors for Construction Defect

In Liberty Oaks Homeowner’s Ass’n v. Liberty Oaks, LLC, 2014 Ore. App. LEXIS 1696, the Liberty Oaks Homeowners’ Association (“HOA”)

Pennsylvania Community Associations Benefit from Amendments to Uniform Planned Community Act and Uniform Condo Act

On April 20, 2016, Governor Tom Wolf signed into law, Act 21 – House Bill 1340, sponsored by Rep. Martina